GREEN RIVER FISHING REPORT:

_MG_5709


This is my effort to keep you posted on the current fishing conditions on the Flaming Gorge Tailwater of Utah’s Green River.


It will be updated weekly, but understand that it is not the word of god, simply my observations of the fly fishing conditions as they seem to be.
(all rankings are in + (+++++ being highest)

REPORT FOR 4/17/2014


  • WEATHER: ++++ (the weather has been rather inconsistent lately.)

  • CROWDS:+(HIGHER RANKING MEANS LESS CROWDS WILL BE EXPERIENCED)


Spring fishing on the Green is officially upon us, that time where the fish are returning from their winter lethargy, the water temperatures are rising, and the insects are beginning their resurgences. The midges are about in full force, emerging from their nymph stages, and becoming sexually mature adults. The fish notice this change, and are readily available to accept a properly presented dainty morsel. As well, the BWO’s are beginning their adult stage of their life cycle. The early afternoons can be some absolutely amazing nymph fishing, as well as, weather permitting, a dry fly fisherman’s favorite site. The visions of wary trout daintily sipping an adult mayfly off the surface of the water, leaving nothing but a subtle ripple in their wake are dancing in my head.

But, don’t neglect the streamer, there are still plenty of fish in the water ready to hungrily eat a streamer presented close to the banks, or plunging through the depths of the cool clear water. So get out there, and get some Green River spring fishing in for yourself.

Section A: ++++



With spring fishing upon us, the techniques can change it up a bit. I will start to focus on more moving water, searching less for pods of fish hanging tight looking for an easy and diminutive meal. A typical starting point for me this time of year is with a 7-9’ nymph rig, weighted with 1-2 #4 split shot, I like to lead this rig with a small black, or red zebra midge (sz. 18) and trail either another zebra midge, or one of many small midge emerger patterns. As the day progresses, and a typical float trip makes it’s way down the river, I like to switch my rig (about half way down the river, 1-2pm) to a shallow, extremely light (1 #6 split shot, or two bead heads) nymph rig. My mid day rig tends to run about 4-5’ deep.

Throughout the day, keep your eyes open for rising fish. In the mornings lean a little more towards your favorite Midge dry fly patterns. In the early-mid afternoon, try a lot of different BWO dry patterns. My personal favorites being Parachute Adams, Biot Bodies Cripples, Hackle Stackers, and Befus Emergers.

While Streamers are not quite as consistent as earlier in the year, be ready with a few, especially if you happen upon a dark and overcast days. Meat-eating browns, and the occasional Rainbows, seem to prefer to eat the streamer on the foul weather days. Try Blacks, Olives, Goldilox, or Ginger.

Pike have been getting pulled out of the A section, as high as the first mile, be ready for a chance at one if you are so inclined.

Section B: ++++



Nymphing the B section of the Green can be slightly less technical than it’s counterpart on A. Typically, at this time of year I find my greatest success fishing a 7-8’ nymph rig weighted with either a single no. 4 or BB split shot, followed by a sz. 14-16 brown zebra midge. Trailing this fly, I will typically fish a smaller sz. 18 Black Zebra Midge, a soft hackle, Barr’s emerger, or Craven’s JuJu Baetis (or midge).

Streamer fishing will typically find the angler with better success on B, than on A. I tend to fish brighter flies (White, Goldilox, playmate of the years, and Ginger) on bright sunnier days, and Darker (Black, Brown, and Olive) Streamers on the darker, stormier, overcast days. I like to fish sink tip fly lines, opening up my options in the deeper holes, and runs. But a floating line with a medium, to heavily weighted streamer can have great success as well.

Section C: ++++




The C section is my favorite section to fish this time of year. While not the most overall productive fishing, I enjoy the streamer fishing with the chances of huge Browns to be quite exhilarating. Color combinations that I prefer to fish, follow the same string of logic as that of the B section.

PIKE ALERT!!! I am somewhat unfamiliar with typical tactics for these aggressive, toothy, predators. But they are in the river, primarily on the lower B, and all of the C sections. The Utah DWR has a catch and kill order on these invasive predators. So if you are the kind of angler who likes to take their catch home for dinner, I highly suggest pursuing these fish. Help us keep our Green River ecosystem balanced. I have had my greatest luck throwing White, Orange, or Yellow Streamers at these fish.

HOT FLIES!!!!!!!



NYMPH


  • ZEBRA MIDGES (SZ. 18-22), IN BLACK, RED, WINE, GREY OR BROWN)
  • NEON NIGHTMARES
  • CRAVEN’S JUJU MIDGE (SZ. 18-22)
  • PHEASANT TAILS (18-24)
  • SAN JUAN WORM (SZ. 4-14)
  • CRAVEN’S JUJU BAETIS (16-22)
  • RS2’S IN MIDGE AND BAETIS COLORS AND SIZES
  • WD-40’S IN MIDGE AND BAETIS COLORS AND SIZES
  • Scuds
  • Eggs


DRIES



  • Parachute Adams (sz. 18-26)
  • Griffiths Gnats (sz. 18-22)
  • Black Triple Doubles (Sz. 16)
  • Sparkle Baetis Emergers (Sz. 16-22)
  • Folded Foam Midge Cripples (sz. 18-22)
  • Orange, and Wine Ashers (sz. 18-22)
  • CDC wing Baetis Cripples (sz. 16-20)
  • Fuzz Balls (sz. 18-22)


STREAMERS


Lunker Flats